Amortization Schedule


Student Loan Calculator



Student Loan Calculator is used to calculate monthly payments for your student loan. The student loan amortization schedule excel will show you the principal, interest, remaining balance of each and every payment, and is exportable as an excel spreadsheet.

Student Loan Amortization Schedule

Loan Amount
Loan Terms
years
Interest Rate
First Payment Date
Amortization schedule
Show By Month Show By Year

Student Loan Payment

Loan Amount:
$25,000.00
Monthly Payment:
$443.68
Total # Of Payments:
60
Start Date:
Apr, 2024
Payoff Date:
Mar, 2029
Total Interest Paid:
$1,621.04
Total Payment:
$26,621.04


Student Loan Amortization Schedule

Payment Date Payment # Interest Paid Principal Paid Total Payment Remaining Balance
Apr, 2024 1 $52.08 $391.60 $443.68 $24,608.40
May, 2024 2 $51.27 $392.42 $443.68 $24,215.98
Jun, 2024 3 $50.45 $393.23 $443.68 $23,822.75
Jul, 2024 4 $49.63 $394.05 $443.68 $23,428.70
Aug, 2024 5 $48.81 $394.87 $443.68 $23,033.82
Sep, 2024 6 $47.99 $395.70 $443.68 $22,638.12
Oct, 2024 7 $47.16 $396.52 $443.68 $22,241.60
Nov, 2024 8 $46.34 $397.35 $443.68 $21,844.26
Dec, 2024 9 $45.51 $398.18 $443.68 $21,446.08
Jan, 2025 10 $44.68 $399.00 $443.68 $21,047.08
Feb, 2025 11 $43.85 $399.84 $443.68 $20,647.24
Mar, 2025 12 $43.02 $400.67 $443.68 $20,246.57
Apr, 2025 13 $42.18 $401.50 $443.68 $19,845.07
May, 2025 14 $41.34 $402.34 $443.68 $19,442.73
Jun, 2025 15 $40.51 $403.18 $443.68 $19,039.55
Jul, 2025 16 $39.67 $404.02 $443.68 $18,635.53
Aug, 2025 17 $38.82 $404.86 $443.68 $18,230.67
Sep, 2025 18 $37.98 $405.70 $443.68 $17,824.97
Oct, 2025 19 $37.14 $406.55 $443.68 $17,418.42
Nov, 2025 20 $36.29 $407.40 $443.68 $17,011.02
Dec, 2025 21 $35.44 $408.24 $443.68 $16,602.78
Jan, 2026 22 $34.59 $409.09 $443.68 $16,193.68
Feb, 2026 23 $33.74 $409.95 $443.68 $15,783.74
Mar, 2026 24 $32.88 $410.80 $443.68 $15,372.93
Apr, 2026 25 $32.03 $411.66 $443.68 $14,961.28
May, 2026 26 $31.17 $412.51 $443.68 $14,548.76
Jun, 2026 27 $30.31 $413.37 $443.68 $14,135.39
Jul, 2026 28 $29.45 $414.24 $443.68 $13,721.15
Aug, 2026 29 $28.59 $415.10 $443.68 $13,306.06
Sep, 2026 30 $27.72 $415.96 $443.68 $12,890.09
Oct, 2026 31 $26.85 $416.83 $443.68 $12,473.26
Nov, 2026 32 $25.99 $417.70 $443.68 $12,055.56
Dec, 2026 33 $25.12 $418.57 $443.68 $11,637.00
Jan, 2027 34 $24.24 $419.44 $443.68 $11,217.56
Feb, 2027 35 $23.37 $420.31 $443.68 $10,797.24
Mar, 2027 36 $22.49 $421.19 $443.68 $10,376.05
Apr, 2027 37 $21.62 $422.07 $443.68 $9,953.98
May, 2027 38 $20.74 $422.95 $443.68 $9,531.04
Jun, 2027 39 $19.86 $423.83 $443.68 $9,107.21
Jul, 2027 40 $18.97 $424.71 $443.68 $8,682.50
Aug, 2027 41 $18.09 $425.60 $443.68 $8,256.90
Sep, 2027 42 $17.20 $426.48 $443.68 $7,830.42
Oct, 2027 43 $16.31 $427.37 $443.68 $7,403.05
Nov, 2027 44 $15.42 $428.26 $443.68 $6,974.79
Dec, 2027 45 $14.53 $429.15 $443.68 $6,545.64
Jan, 2028 46 $13.64 $430.05 $443.68 $6,115.59
Feb, 2028 47 $12.74 $430.94 $443.68 $5,684.65
Mar, 2028 48 $11.84 $431.84 $443.68 $5,252.81
Apr, 2028 49 $10.94 $432.74 $443.68 $4,820.06
May, 2028 50 $10.04 $433.64 $443.68 $4,386.42
Jun, 2028 51 $9.14 $434.55 $443.68 $3,951.88
Jul, 2028 52 $8.23 $435.45 $443.68 $3,516.43
Aug, 2028 53 $7.33 $436.36 $443.68 $3,080.07
Sep, 2028 54 $6.42 $437.27 $443.68 $2,642.80
Oct, 2028 55 $5.51 $438.18 $443.68 $2,204.62
Nov, 2028 56 $4.59 $439.09 $443.68 $1,765.53
Dec, 2028 57 $3.68 $440.01 $443.68 $1,325.53
Jan, 2029 58 $2.76 $440.92 $443.68 $884.60
Feb, 2029 59 $1.84 $441.84 $443.68 $442.76
Mar, 2029 60 $0.92 $442.76 $443.68 $0.00


What is a student loan?

A student loan is a loan granted to a student to cover the cost of going to college. You can use a student loan to pay for tuition, textbooks, computers, rent, or any other associated costs. Student loans can come from the Federal government, banks, or other private financial institutions. Student loans from the Federal government have the lowest interest rate and other benefits that other lenders don't offer.


How does a student loan work?

Like any other loan, student loans need to be paid back with interest. You can start paying interest while you are in school or you can wait until you graduate from college. There are many types of student loans, some are sponsored by the Federal government, and others are from private lenders. Most student loans start accruing interest while you are in school with the exception of Federal subsidized loans. By the time you graduated, the loan balance would have increased. Fortunately, you can start paying for your student loan while you are still in school. Paying while you are still studying is a good way to keep your loan balance low.


Student Loans FAQs


What is the grace period for student loans?

For most Federal student loans, you have a grace period of six months after graduation, leave school, or drop below half-time enrollment to start repaying the student loan.


Do you have to pay interest for student loans while in school?

It depends. You are not required to pay interest while in school with a subsidized loan from the Federal. A subsidized loan is a type of loan for undergraduate students with financial needs. If you have a Federal unsubsidized loan or student loan from a private lender, the interest will start accruing as soon as the funds are sent to the school.


What's the difference between Federal and private student loans?

Federal student loans are fixed interest with lower interest rates than loans from private lenders.


What's the difference between Subsidized Loans and Unsubsidized Loans?

Federal subsidized loans are only available for undergraduate students with financial needs while unsubsidized loans are available for all undergraduate and graduate students.


Can you pay student loans with a credit card?

No, you cannot pay a Federal student loan with a credit card. You may be able to pay a private lender with a credit card, but don't bet on it. Credit card companies charge transaction and processing fees, most lenders do not want to pay these fees. Even if your private lender does allow credit card payments, it may not be a good idea as credit cards typically have very high interest rates. It may also hurt your credit score as your credit usage will rise substantially with student loan payments.




Do student loans impact your credit score?

Yes, student loans do impact your credit report and score. Making timely payments for your student loan improves your credit score. On the negative side, missing or late payments will hurt your credit score.


Should I refinance my student loan?

If you have a good credit score and a job that pays well, then refinancing is a good option. Lenders may give you a better interest rate than the current interest rate for your student loan. You will save money on interest when you refinance your student loan.


How much is too much student loan debt?

If your student loan is making you lose sleep at night, then you probably owe too much in student loans. Research the average starting salary a graduate makes in your field of study and keep your student loan cap at that salary. For example, if you expect to make $50,000 the first year out of college, you should not borrow more than $50,000 in student loans.


When will student loans be forgiven?

For Federal student loans, any outstanding balance will be forgiven after 20 years for undergraduate study, or 25 years for graduate study.


How to pay off student loans?

There are many ways you can pay off your student loans, here are some tips.

  • Start paying as early as possible - you can start paying your student loan while you are still in school. You don't have to wait until graduation.

  • Start saving more - the more you save, the more money you can use to pay for your student loan. Cut unnecessary spending and pay more than the minimum payments for your loan. Review your credit cards and see where you can cut your spending.

  • Increase your income - you can generate income while you are in school. Get a part-time job or find some online gigs that you can work from home or remotely.

  • Increase your monthly payment - don't just make minimum payments on your student loan. Pay extra money if you can afford to reduce your principal. Cutting the loan balance will save you money on interest payments. Tell the lender that the extra payment is for reducing your loan balance, and not for paying the next month's bill early.

  • Refinance your student loan - if your credit score is good and have a stable job, you can find a lender that can refinance your student loan into a new loan with a lower interest rate and monthly payment. Compare multiple lenders and see which one gives you the lowest interest rate and overall costs.

  • Apply for student loan forgiveness program - apply for all loan forgiveness programs that you may qualify for. Loan forgiveness programs will bring down your student loan dramatically depending on how much you still owe.

  • Borrow money from friends and families - you may find friends and relatives who may lend you money to pay off some of your student loans. The more money you can borrow and pay toward the loan balance, the less interest you will pay.

  • Debt consolidation loan - if you have student loans and credit card debt, you may consolidate them into one loan with lower interest. You will need to shop around and see if any lender offers debt consolidation loans. You will need to have a good credit score to get competitive rates.



Should I pay off my student loan early?

In general, it is a good idea to pay off your student loan early if you can afford it as it will save you money on interest. However, there are situations where paying off your student loan early might not be a great idea. For example, if you have other debt or loans such as credit cards with higher interest rates than your student loan, you should pay off your credit cards first. If you still have money left over after paying all the debt that has a higher interest rate, then pay off your student loan.

Student Loan Payoff Calculator

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